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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 990
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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The image comes from Adventures by Land & Sea, with an introduction by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, illustrated by T. Dart Walker, published New York, 1903 by P.P. Collier & Son.

The work reproduces H. Rider Haggard's piece on Isandlwana and Rorke's Drift.

John Y.

(Alan, The D of Drift keeps defaulting to lower case. JY)
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Alan
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Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 1462
Location: Wales
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John,

I originally intercepted to only allow cap D in Drift. I have now deleted so there shouldn't be a problem. (See - drift and Drift.)

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John

Thanks for letting me know where the image is located.

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John

You wouldn't happen to have seen a good quality illustration of a British officer, late 1870s - early 1880s, standing alone during a battle, with a revolver in each hand, at all ?

I've only ever seen U.S. cavalry/infantry officers in such a pose, ACW and Indian Wars, usually Custer in the latter.

It would be such a great image to have of a British officer.

Hope you can help.

Thanks

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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 990
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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No, not at all, a colonial with a revolver in both hands now that a different matter!

John Y.
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John

Thanks.

Pity, though, would have been a nice, perhaps unusual(?) image of a British officer.

I know revolvers were quite expensive to buy then, but I was considering recently the incident with Pope and Godwin-Austen, where one of them had been hit, leaving the other standing, in my mind, having picked up his fellow officer's pistol to hold back the Zulus.

As you can see, my mind tends to wander quite a bit ! Wink

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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 990
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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I do have some strange ones...


As you can see.

John Y.
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John

Looks like his revolver is the 12-shot type I mentioned elsewhere, judging by the cylinder. Smile

I don't wish to be a nuisance John, but images in books and the excellent ones you have posted here previously, are the nearest I can think of, to storyboarding specific incidents.

I can visualise the scenes, but good illustrations are much better.

Thankyou

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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 990
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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Whilst you're visualising scenes how about this recent acquisition?



Look at his pistol; it looks like a 'pepperbox'.

John Y.
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Sawubona


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 1179
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Incredible detail, even apparently down to the eye wound! Is that an etching? It looks almost like a sepia photograph! What are the dimensions of your copy, John?
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ciscokid


Joined: 01 Nov 2008
Posts: 54
Location: Plymouth, Devon
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awesome - thanks for sharing
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John

Thanks. Great image, very clear, and as mentioned, it does look like a photograph.

You're right about the revolver, as with all the attention to detail in the whole picture, it doesn't look like an Adams or similar.

Appears to be a bit larger.

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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 990
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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It is a French cabinet card size composite photograph, an early version of Photoshop, there some real people there mixed in with drawings and backdrops. Louis head has been cut & pasted on to a model's body.

I've got a couple detailing Louis' life.

John Y.
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Sawubona


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
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Knowing that now, John, I believe I can see the composite effect and pick out the real people. Fascinating use of multimedia! Almost a CG effect a century before the "C"... One wouldn't know it until told, but then knowing, it becomes more apparent.
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Sawubona


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
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I wonder that the revolver pictured might be a Le Mat, an American Civil War and later vintage sidearm developed in the US, but produced for several years in Paris as well as elsewhere. Originally made as a percussion revolver, it eventually evolved into a centerfire or pin fire cartridge loaded weapon sporting nine shots in the cylinder of various calibers up to .50 and in addition a second barrel with a single shotgun round down to 16 gauge. Fairly inaccurate, it was a wicked weapon at close range and weighed almost a full pound more than a contemporary Adams-- a big, no nonsense handgun.

I'm not suggesting that he carried a Le Mat necessarily, but rather that the artist used one for the model of a pistol he might have carried in Zululand.
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Recorded Use Of The Infantry Officer's Sword In The AZW ?
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