rorkesdriftvc.com Forum Index


rorkesdriftvc.com
Discussions related to the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879
Reply to topic
PLEASE HELP which type of Martini Henry this is?
chasejmartin


Joined: 07 Apr 2007
Posts: 4
Reply with quote


I bought this Martini and i know it is diffrent to the other ones any ideas what it is also it has these markings and i cant find them any where on the net




Thanks[/img]
View user's profileSend private message
Mikey29211


Joined: 26 Aug 2006
Posts: 226
Location: Central Nebraska, USA
Reply with quote
Can you post a pic of the receiver with the cocking indicator in the open position (cocked) with the markings showing. It also looks like there is a safety catch next to the trigger.

It's hard to tell but it looks like a military MKI or MKII that has been cut down from the muzzle end. Is there a thumb rest on the receiver?

Please post more photos..
View user's profileSend private message
chasejmartin


Joined: 07 Apr 2007
Posts: 4
Reply with quote
Thanks for the reply here are some pics; there is no markings near the cocking indicator.







View user's profileSend private message
Mikey29211


Joined: 26 Aug 2006
Posts: 226
Location: Central Nebraska, USA
Reply with quote
I'm sorry i can't help here, i have never seen a MH without the QVC stamp and date and MK stamp next to the cocking indicaor.
To me anyway it looks like good workmanship so i wouldn't think it is a Khyber Pass knock-off.(I'm no expert)

You could try Jason at www.martinihenry.com and send him your photos

His site is down at the moment.


You can see the QVC cypher, dates and MKI stamps on mine
View user's profileSend private message
Neil Aspinshaw


Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Posts: 289
Location: Loughborough
Reply with quote
Hmm. This look to have been built out of various parts.
The Proof marks look like Liege. But then agian the barrel is odd anyway. The proof marks are not military.
The forend hook and forend wood is military, it is off a cavalry carbine, there looks to be filled holes between the reciver and middle band, (also staining) that is where the screws that held the leather sight protector once where, the sight is part of the barrel and is brazed on on a rifle, whereby the carbine rear sight is dovetailed on and can be removed. The front band fitted is also from a cavalry carbine as there is no bayonet lug, so this whole assembly has been replaced.

The cocking indicator is off a Mk1/2 rifle, being a long indicator variety. that is incorrect for the receiver as the Mk3 rifle and Cavalry carbines did not use that size indicator, the lack of a broad arrow point this to be a later addition or, my guess what you have is... A private purchase rifle, either Birmingham or Liege trade pattern. With a M-H cavalry carbine forend fitted.

One last thing... is it rifled? or has it been smoothbored.
Neil www.martinihenry.co.uk

_________________
Neil
View user's profileSend private messageSend e-mailVisit poster's website
Adrian Whiting


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 76
Location: Dorset, England
Reply with quote
Hello,

These are indeed Belgian proof marks applied at Liege. The "E" over "LG" over a star is the black powder proof. The mark that looks like a baton on top of a pyramid is the black powder view mark. The others are the viewer's marks.

The Belgian trade produced many military pattern Martini Henrys, though for civilian use. These are not, to my recollection, Belgian military proof marks, as the military proof is surmounted by a crown above the "E" etc. Rifles such as these were retailed privately, and in many cases, though not this one, the retailer applied their own details to the knoxform, or flat area just forward of the actiona body. I have seen examples with retailer's details engraved on the side of the action body too.

Martini Henrys in British service calibre were popular civilian arms, given the ready availability of the ammunition. They were widely used for target shooting and for shooting game.

Neil is absolutely right in that a British service cavalry carbine forend (second pattern as far as I can tell) has been fitted subsequently. The rifle appears to have retained a rifle length cleaning rod. The picture is not absolutely clear but it looks as if the protruding end is threaded? If so the rod is either of a trade pattern too, is inserted the wrong way round (which is usually not possible unless the head has been ground down) or is a carbine length not fully pushed home (although the same would apply as to the rod apparently being the wrong way round).

The cocking indicator would not be correct if this were a British Service Martini Henry MkIII, but is correct for the Belgian trade patterns.

Essentially I would concur with Neil, and offer that you have a Belgian manufactured rifle, for civilian purchase, subsequently fitted with a British MHCC forend.

_________________
Hope this assists,
Adrian
View user's profileSend private message
chasejmartin


Joined: 07 Apr 2007
Posts: 4
Reply with quote
Thanks for the replys!! the cost of this rifle was 430 was this good????

Thanks again all
View user's profileSend private message
Neil Aspinshaw


Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Posts: 289
Location: Loughborough
Reply with quote
Sort of, you would be better trying to obtain a new rifle forend wood for it, to make it more authentic, as at the moment its a BITSA as we call them, a bit of this and a bit of that.
Neil

_________________
Neil
View user's profileSend private messageSend e-mailVisit poster's website
chasejmartin


Joined: 07 Apr 2007
Posts: 4
Reply with quote
OK Thanks where can i get one?? how much are they normaly ??

Thanks All
View user's profileSend private message
PLEASE HELP which type of Martini Henry this is?
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
All times are GMT  
Page 1 of 1  

  
  
 Reply to topic