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Isandhlwana Participants As They Were When Living
Colin


Joined: 22 Nov 2017
Posts: 72
Location: U.K.
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I've been watching a lot of films, etc., over the years that use motion capture, computer graphics, etc. As such, I started looking at portrait photographs of the main participants present on the day, noticing that it would be possible for this technology to attempt to make them reappear as they were in any future film, removing criticism of miscast actors. I know this goes against the grain of films from old, but could be a way forward to making how they looked visually more accurately. Additionally, the sheer scale of Isandhlwana would involve the same tech used in LOTR, etc, but more importantly up-to-date movies

All portraits could be accumulated of them showing as many different angles of their features, in order to get profile images as well as face on views

Too much annoyed many in Zulu Dawn when trying to accomplish it with little money and only actors and extras, reducing numbers that lessened the British forces and Zulus, but also details like the actual size of the camp and shape of the mountain itself.

I know this subject has been discussed regularly, but tech has moved on apace since last considered

All previous concerns about needing to film on location in Africa, the sheer logistics of such and not forgetting the cost, would be made null and void
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Alan
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Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 1359
Location: Wales
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Colin,

I'm no film buff but the first things I would say is that the PC anti-colonial world has overtaken commonsense.
A subject like Red Coats massacring indigenous spear wielding natives would be way down on the list for
films to be treated that way.

Of course, CAD technology today would work wonders with accuracy regarding numbers, locations
and special effects. No more spare shields at the end of poles to increase visual numbers.

Any film today would employ these latest techniques but the will to remake Zulu wouldn't be there in
the present social climate. Some might say, good things too.

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Colin


Joined: 22 Nov 2017
Posts: 72
Location: U.K.
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Alan, I understand what you are saying, PC has it's part to play to a point, but how far to let it limit the depiction of military history and bravery involved. I'm thinking of the recent large scale production of Dunkirk, where bravery of thousands of men trapped on a beach under constant fire, plus those who both arrive to rescue them. Previously, the idea of making a film now of this type, was not thought to be possible due to nobody liking the concept of watching a defeat or even a retreat from the enemy, yet heroism can still be shown regardless. Isandhlwana rather than Rorke's Drift shows a Zulu victory not lacking of bravery on both sides in an open battlefield. Seeing the soldiers vulnerable to attack on the beach at Dunkirk is heartbreaking, but even understood in history, it still can be brought home to audiences through film the terror they faced and decisions being made by High Command. Do military films have to be prevented from showing the ugliness of war, then begs the question, how else can war be shown. There seems to be an interest gaining in WW1 and WW2 again, perhaps by those worried about us losing our way with real history, and opting for the overwhelming superhero franchises that dominate, meaning historic reality is lost to all

There is a clip that sort of illustrates their dilemma, in much the same way as what was happening at Isandhlwana, which was a British soldier picking up a leaflet that said - 'We Surround You'
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Alan
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Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 1359
Location: Wales
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Colin,

of course I understand and agree. What I'm saying is that the recent attitude of the vocal section of society
that anything colonial equals bad, irrespective of the true events or whether it's about the individuals or not.
Unfortunately, that attitude holds great sway and 'the money' would be hard to come by.

Dunkirk is recent history and didn't come out of colonialism, unless you include old Adolf.

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Colin


Joined: 22 Nov 2017
Posts: 72
Location: U.K.
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Fortunately, or unfortunately, depends on one's point of view I guess, an Isandhlwana film wouldn't be forthcoming any time soon anyway, unless already underway which we don't know about. Highly doubtful.

It really was to discuss it hypothetically on how it would possibly be created.

The recent Youtube clips of Zulu Dawn being made, albeit not a successful film, did show the logistics involved in live action and on location, etc., etc.

19th Century military conflict does appear to be overlooked/ignored more than most eras, though medieval, mainly in tv series, seems to be quite popular, not my taste though and I'm unwilling to change my interest to suit it
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Isandhlwana Participants As They Were When Living
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