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Ken Gillings


Joined: 23 Apr 2006
Posts: 61
Location: KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
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Coll, definitely not that I'm aware of. Izabel could probably assist in direct contact, otherwise drop me a mail and I'll put the suggestion to the commanding officer. Ken

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Ken Gillings
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Ken

Thanks. Yes, it'd be great if something of this nature could be organised for an Isandlwana Anniversary, in 2013, or any year after.

Certainly something worth considering.

Thanks again

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Ken

I've sent you a pm.

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Positive response from the Commanding Officer of the Natal Carbineers.

When notified of the arrangements, they will be present.

As this situation is new to me, I don't know how to go about organising such an event, so wish to ask for any assistance that could be given, from RDVC members in a position to aid in both the planning and obtaining the wreath.

As I am located so far away and can't get to Africa myself, I don't know the availability and costs of anything required.

A wreath laying at Col. Durnford's grave by the Natal Carbineers, would be important, meaningful and historic in itself, as you can understand.

2013 might be too early to get anything prepared for then, so may need to be left until 2014.

An event like this, should be of interest to us all, so please help, as I'm out of my depth at present.

Thank you

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Alan
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Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 1418
Location: Wales
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I came across this pic I took of Hughes' grave at Fort Napier.




I also have a pic of a Capt. Stourton. Anyone know who he is?

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Alan
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Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 1418
Location: Wales
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Details of Capt. Stourton from:
The South Africa Campaign of 1878/1879
By
Ian Knight and Dr Adrian Greaves


MARMADUKE STOURTON
CAPTAIN, 63RD REGIMENT (WEST SUFFOLK).
Captain Marmaduke Stourton, who died at Pietermaritzburg, on 18th April 1879, was the eldest son of the late Hon. William Stourton, of Yorkshire, by his marriage with Catherine, daughter of Edmund Scully, Esq., of Bloomfield, co. Tipperary. He was born on 14 January 1840, and was educated at Downside College, near Bath; at Namur, in Belgium; and at Stonyhurst College, Lancashire. Entering the army in May 1861, he was gazetted to an ensigncy in the 8th Foot, and served with that regiment at Malta, at Gibraltar, in India, and at the depôt in England. He became Lieutenant in 1864, and obtained his company in 1870, in which year he exchanged into the 63rd Regiment. He shortly afterwards embarked with that corps for India, and served there at various stations for several years.
On the news of the disaster at Isandlwana reaching England in February 1879, Captain Stourton who was at the depôt of his regiment at Ashton-under-Lyne, immediately volunteered for South Africa. He was selected as a special service officer to take up duty with the 24th Regiment, and was sent out, on 1st March in the transport “Clyde.” The vessel was wrecked in St. Simon’s Bay but owing to the admirable discipline that prevailed, no lives were lost, and all the troops were safely landed on the coast. Arriving shortly afterwards at Durban, Captain Stourton proceeded in charge of drafts of the 24th Regiment to Pietermaritzburg. During the morning 18 April he marched a distance of twelve miles, and was the cheeriest of the party – singing, bugling, and keeping up the spirits of the men in every possible way; but the afternoon’s advance commenced with an exceedingly steep ascent, on surmounting which he gasped for breath. Turning to an officer of the Artillery, he said: “I feel my life-blood ebbing away. I am nearly done.” Instead of falling out, he continued with the column in its march up another trying hill to the camp. When the bugle sounded “Halt,” he had just sufficient strength left to give his word of command, and then fell fainting to the ground. Within an hour afterwards, in spite of every exertion made by his comrades, his prophecy had been fulfilled, and his gallant spirit had passed away.
Though Captain Stourton’s death did not take place in the battlefield, he none the less rendered up his life in the service of his country. In spite of physical weakness he struggled on, a brave example to his men; and when his work was accomplished, he simply lay down and died. His remains were buried, with military honours, in the camp cemetery at Pietermaritzburg. The officers and men of the draft with which he had served erected a stone over the grave.
Captain Stourton married, in 1870, Marie, daughter of William Franks, Esq.


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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 982
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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Alan,

Captain Marmaduke Stourton, 63rd (West Suffolk) Regiment.

When news of Isandlwana broke in the U.K. he was serving at his regiment's depot in Ashton-under-Lyne, he immediately volunteered for service in South Africa.

He went out on The Clyde with the replacement draft for the 1st/24th, along a certain Jahleel Carey. The Clyde wrecked off of Dyer's Island some 70 miles from Simon's Bay on 3rd April 1879 without loss of life, however, four Gatling Guns and a large quantity of stores and ammunition were lost.

Stourton and the remainder of the draft eventually reached Natal on 11th April 1879. On 18th April he was marching with the draft from Pietermaritzburg, what happened next is retold in MacKinnon & Shabolt's South African Campaign of 1879:

During the morning of the 18th of April he marched a distance of twelve miles, and was the cheeriest of the party - singing, bugling, and keeping up the spirits of the men in every possible way; but the afternoon’s advance commenced an exceedingly steep ascent, on surmounting which he grasped for breath. Turning to an officer of the Artillery, he said: “I feel my life-blood ebbing away. I am nearly done.” Instead of falling out, he continued with the Column in its march up another trying hill to the camp. When the bugle sounded ‘Halt,’ he had just sufficient strength to give his word of command, and then fell fainting to the ground. Within an hour afterwards, in spite of every exertion made by his comrades, his prophecy had been fulfilled, and his gallant spirit had passed away.


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Martin Everett


Joined: 01 Sep 2005
Posts: 784
Location: Brecon
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John,

Thought you would also have mentioned Captain Sir William Alexander Gordon Gordon-Cumming, 4th Baronet (20 July 1848 – 20 May 1930) Scots Guards - notorious womaniser, he is best known for being the central figure in the Royal Baccarat Scandal who was on the Clyde.

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Martin Everett
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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 982
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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Martin,

I have mentioned the much-maligned & misunderstood Gordon-Cumming in the past either on this forum or the VWF.

In the interest of fairness I'll mention all the officers of the draft, which actually includes a very distance relative of mine:

Brevet-Colonel H. F. Davies, Grenadier Guards; Captain W. M. Brander, 24th Regiment; Captain F. Glennie, 24th Regiment; Lieutenant F. S. Halliday, 24th Regiment; Captain Sir W. G. Gordon Cumming, Bart., Scots Guards[sic.]; Captain the Hon R. S. G. Stapleton Cotton, Scots Guards; Captain the Hon G. A. V. Bertie, Coldstream Guards; Lieutenant the Hon R. C. G. Carington, Grenadier Guards; Lieutenant W. D. McFarrer, Grenadier Guards; Lieutenant the Hon C. R. W. Colville, Grenadier Guards; Captain M. Stourton, 63rd Regiment; Lieutenant J. B .Carey, 98th Regiment; Lieutenant G. S. Nicholson, 1-7th Regiment, Captain F. Coppinger, A. P. D.; and Surgeon-Major E. Ward, A. M. D.

Source:In Zululand Throughout the War of 1879 by Charles Norris Newman

Regards,

John
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Martin Everett


Joined: 01 Sep 2005
Posts: 784
Location: Brecon
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John,

Lt Carington is the grandfather of Lord Carrington KG.

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Martin Everett
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Col. Durnford's Grave's Condition ?
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