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The Law And Weaponry ?
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I'm in a dilemma, well, not at present, but perhaps when wanting to add items to my hobby(ies).

I know firearms are causing problems legally in the U.K., but my question deals with other types.

You may have seen the excellent Alamo Bowie knife I provided a link to previously, so it includes this, plus my interest in archery, being the longbow, as well as duelling pistols.

Quite a mix, and I know they aren't AZW-related, but these are the only weapons I would consider getting at any time, apart from maybe a deactivated Adams revolver.

My question is this, as the law goes, what is/would be the process of acquiring any or all of these weapons legally ?

Thanks in advance.

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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 980
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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Don't forget you've got your own parliament up there, and therefore your own laws. What applies in England & Wales doesn't matter a jot in your neck of the woods.

After all what would amount to a 'point or blade' south of the border is part of your national dress, and is hidden down your sock! What with that and your sporran licences, I think if you have concerns you should seek the advice of your polis.

John Y.
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diagralex


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 208
Location: Broomfield, Essex
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The Adams revolver, under English law, is technically an antique weapon and does not need de-activating in order for you to keep it. It is the propellant which requires a firearms licence
As John says though, best to check before purchasing anything

Graham


Last edited by diagralex on Thu Feb 07, 2008 10:30 am; edited 1 time in total
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Simon


Joined: 26 Feb 2007
Posts: 95
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Hi,

I’ve had a similar problem. As part of my AZW obsession (the ‘memsahibs’ words not mine!!), I got my hands on a MK II 1876 Martini Henry (which being obsolete can be owned without a licence).

The centrepiece of my collection proudly stands in the corner of the room, accompanied by one or two more trinkets (it’s a bit of an eye opener for visitors – a Martini in one corner and a de-ac Bren in the other!!).

I had the idea of joining a re-enactment group to get some use out of the rifle but to fire it at displays/meetings, (even if not keeping the blank ammunition at home), I need a firearms licence, which entails the gun being stored in a steel cabinet etc etc. Which to be honest with you, I’m not going to do because I brought it for display purposes (and I certainly don’t feel inclined to do some ‘lef right, lef righting’ and shouting “Bang” when everybody else fires).

Cheers

Simon
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John

The trouble nationwide is what is called a knife-culture, where North and South of the border restrictions apply. To obtain the above mentioned Alamo Bowie, which I don't think is available in the U.K., would have to come from the U.S., would/could create difficulties.

The small knife known to be part of our national dress, isn't like the Bowie, which looks to be half the size of a Claymore ! Shocked

As for the Longbow, what category that could come under, obviously considering that people own modern equivalents, well, I don't know, are they considered, in a way, in the same or lesser category as firearms ?

Crossbows, may also come under this specific category.

Duelling Pistols can usually be supplied as a pair in a presentation case, but I'd expect them to be deactivated, although I don't know the best or most common makes used for this purpose. As for their prices, I haven't a clue.

Graham

A deactivated Adams revolver, would only be purchased, if, I managed to go ahead financially, to recreate Col. Durnford's uniform - including pistol, hunting knife and all.

It really confuses me regards the law covering each type of weapon, and priding myself as a law-abiding citizen, wouldn't want to break any rules.

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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 980
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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But they are not the same restrictions! I cannot advise you as to your parliament's laws, which is why I advised you to seek advice from your local constabulary. Check out references suchas http://www.Scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/06/27110147/01558

If you want a period knife then look on e-Bay or alike. If you're seeking a modern Bowie knife, you don't have to buy one in from the U.S.A., on a recent visit to Edinburgh I found a shop at the start of the Royal Mile selling them, along with Braveheart claymores and alike.

South of the border I wouldn't expect to see duelling pistols de-activated either.

John Y.
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John

I understand what you are saying.

The Alamo Bowie I gave the link for to see images of, I'm sure is the same model that was stated as being included in the Alamo Museum, as was the one Jason Patric used in the Alamo film.

Something similar wouldn't do, it has to be this model, which appears to be only available in the U.S.

I'm maybe being awkward, but I would just want as near the real thing as I can get, of the one in the Museum and the film.

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.450 adams
andywebb


Joined: 13 Jun 2007
Posts: 15
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Hi,
Just a note that the .450 Adams breach loading pistol is a section 7.1 or 7.3 firearm and must be on this type of firearm licence.
With the Martini or any other obsolete calibre gun, if one round is held it is then a section 1 firearm!!

http://police.homeoffice.gov.uk/news-and-publications/publication/operational-policing/HO-Firearms-Guidance.pdf?view=Binary

Regards
Andy Smile

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Simon


Joined: 26 Feb 2007
Posts: 95
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Having glanced at the 'Firearms Law - Guidance to Police 2002'

No wonder the lawyers get paid so much.........I may as well be reading Swedish Confused
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Away from law and ownership of the above mentioned weapons, I wondered if anyone had read these titles on the bow, Bowie knife and duelling-

The Bowie Knife : Unsheathing an American Legend.
by Norm Flayderman.

The Traditional Bowyer's Bible. (3 Volume Set)

The Duelling Handbook 1829.
by Joseph Hamilton.

Thanks

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Adrian Whiting


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 76
Location: Dorset, England
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Scottish law on the items you mention is very much the same as that in England & Wales.

The Bowie Knife would will raise some difficulties as it is potentially likely to be considered a "made" offensive weapon. As such lawful authority or reasonable excuse is needed to possess it in a public place. Import is perfectly possible and possession in a private place is not an issue. A reasonable excuse would include such circumstances as moving house and so on.

The longbow is not subject to specific controls (as a crossbow would be above a particluar draw weight). The possession of it in a public place for sporting purposes would be a defence to any claim that it was an "intended" offensive weapon, as it would show your intent was other than to use it for an offensive purpose.

The legal status of duelling pistols will depend upon what exactly they are. For example, muzzle loading originals will be antiques unless you had any intention of firing them. If you did then you would need to be in possession of a firearms certificate for that purpose. If they were reproductions, then possession would always need to be covered by a firearms certificate.

I would be happy to try and help with any specific questions.

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Adrian
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Adrian

Thanks for your detailed reply.

The Alamo Bowie I would like in a glass-fronted case on the wall, as a presentation piece, rather than as a 'loose'weapon'.

The Duelling Pistols, I've seen mostly in a wooden presentation case, would not be used as working firearms, but de-activated.

As for the Longbow, it is more of a study, but I'd consider a modern equivalent, for use, if managing to locate and gain membership to an archery club.

Thanks again

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I was surprised to find out, when checking the internet, that there is a traditional longbow club a short distance away from where I live. Very Happy

Here's hoping I get fit enough to join.

It'll make a change from being fit for nothing ! Laughing

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As I know Tranters were quite common around the AZW, I saw this title -

The Firearms Of William Tranter, Birmingham Gunsmith.
by R. Stewart.

Apparently it was the New Zealand author/collector life's work.

Additionally, I've seen a book by an edged weapons fighting technique author, which covers the Fighting Tomahawk, which I think was used in the French-Indian War. Rogers Rangers ?
This may have been used on its own or as part of a tomahawk/knife combination, the ability of using both weapons in the hands for unique-style hand-to-hand combat.

This book looks well-illustrated and detailed, but has anyone read of any specific engagement, where such a technique was used to a great extent ?

Thankyou

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